Dark Money Funds Corrupt Legacy Media Like Palm Beach Post

It’s no secret that wealthy, politically motivated donors are the fuel that keeps legacy media machines running nationwide, and that trend has recently proven true of Florida outlets as well.

According to The Capitolist, a web of left-wing, dark money, non-profit groups have joined forces to fund mainstream media companies to create their own agenda-driven media network to advance their policy preferences.

Media Research Center, a center-right organization, has long been monitoring the influence of liberal funding in the media and says the amount of money flowing into allegedly unbiased, mainstream outlets, has been increasing in recent years.

Tim Graham, Director of Media Analysis for the Media Research Center, spoke to The Capitolist.

“Leftist foundations funding the news isn’t so new to public broadcasting. But it’s been growing among for-profit news outlets, which shouldn’t make sense that you would compromise your appearance of neutrality so you can pay for a couple of extra reporters.”

That is what appears to be happening in Florida; mainstream publications like the Palm Beach Post, National Public Radio, and even Politico Florida have all allowed politically-infected funding to enter their organizations.

Last year, the Palm Beach Post took money from the left-wing Knight Foundation. However, that money was first filtered through ProPublica, a purportedly independent investigative media outlet, despite itself receiving money from multiple left-wing sources, according to The Capitolist. The Knight Foundation later gave the Palm Beach Post an award for publishing a story they paid to have written.

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The latest example is the recent scandal regarding the National Public Radio. NPR, a taxpayer-funded organization that has taken money from the likes of George Soros, is planning on partnering with Floodlight News, also funded by left-wing donors, to recycle an old, negative story on The Capitolist to a national audience.

The Media Research Center has been monitoring NPR since 1989 and noticed this relationship.

However, Graham told The Capitolist that partnering with liberal-sounding organizations isn’t out of the ordinary for NPR and that the relationship did not appear biased on the surface despite the underlying money trails.

“NPR at least acknowledged a collaboration with Floodlight, but it merely said ‘This story is a collaboration with Floodlight, a non-profit environmental news organization.’ To the average reader, that doesn’t sound inherently biased.”

Along with the explicit partnership, Floodlight shares some of the same donors as NPR and outlets like it, further connecting the network, according to The Capitolist.

The Capitolist also states that Seeeking Rents publisher Jason Garcia has often been relied on by mainstream outlets, including Politico Florida and the Orlando Sentinel, without question as to how he gets paid. The Capitolist stated that  he ” has a close relationship with State Rep. Ana Eskamani and her sister, lobbyist Ida Eskamini, both of whom have deep ties to the same dark money media network that funds Floodlight News.”

Some on Twitter have noticed these relationships and decided to say something.

 

U.S. Representative of Florida’s 3rd Congressional district, speaking to The Capitolist, banged the same drum.

“It’s extremely troubling that a taxpayer-funded media outlet like NPR is becoming increasingly reliant on the financial support of partisan political groups. When supported by hardworking Americans’ taxpayer dollars, NPR should focus on real reporting instead of taking money from left-wing organizations committed to radical climate and social justice activism.”


Other stories you may want to read:

NY Times Columnist Eviscerates FBI Over Matt Gaetz Investigation “Disgrace for the Ages”

FL Dems Breathe Sigh of Relief as Biden Cancels Trip to Florida

Tax dollars at work: NPR looking to attack Florida’s ‘The Capitolist’

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