10 Great Teen Summer Jobs Part II

6.  Farm or Garden Center—This is an ideal summer job for teens who want to make money and build muscles. Lifting and loading garden supplies and working outside in varying weather conditions make this perfect for a physically active student. Learning about horticulture and lawn care could also be a good experience for the future owner of a landscaping business. Don’t discredit farm work for limiting your future career goals; remember, supermodel Cindy Crawford worked on a farm one summer removing tassels from the tops of corn in her Midwestern hometown.

7.  Tutoring–Academically advanced high school and college students should consider working as tutors. This work requires motivation, dependability, patience, and accountability. Most high school counselors are happy to refer struggling students to peer tutors. Teen tutors could also contact their former elementary and middle school teachers to market their academic services. Teen tutors should also establish a rate per hour of tutoring and communicate this information to parents in writing. Doing so creates a professional image for the tutor and eliminates miscommunication later. Teen tutors who prepare lesson plans for their students and use engaging methods for instruction could aspire to a future career in education. Teaching makes a difference in the lives of others and is a personally fulfilling vocation.

Crafting business

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8.  Crafting Business/Entrepreneurial Venture–Enterprising teens can turn their talents into a small business. Are you a gifted musician who could play for social or religious events? Can you sew? Do you have an idea for a unique service you can market to your neighbors? Starting an entrepreneurial venture takes creativity, hard work, and the ability to sell yourself and your product. One spring, our daughter saw a YouTube video on making hair scrunchies. She bought some material, got busy sewing, and had a decent product inventory by summer. She got some discounted bracelet displays from an accessories store going out of Handmade scrunchiesbusiness and used them to present the scrunchies. Her talent and persistence paid off as she struck a deal with a local hair salon owner who would sell her scrunchies and give her practically all of the profit. Many established small business owners give back to their community by helping entrepreneurial teens. Working a neighborhood garage sale could earn a bright teen some extra cash. Dedicated garage sale shoppers hate interrupting their bargain hunt to search for a snack or cold beverage. Business savvy teens with a cooler, ice and a friendly demeanor can quickly sell bottled water and soft drinks during peak hours. The demand for refreshments is high; provide the supply and make a profit.

9.  Estate Sale Worker–The estate sales industry is booming, and dedicated employees are hard to find. Most estate sales run for three days and discount items on the final day. With inside knowledge of the merchandise, college-bound teens working for an estate sale company could furnish their dorm rooms or bike repairapartments with quality items for a fraction of the cost. This job may require some physical labor to set up a sale and move furniture, but most sales happen in air-conditioned private homes. This job has growth potential, and learning how to price vintage items could lead to a career in the collectibles industry. 

10.  Repair/Maintenance–Mechanically inclined teens could find work assembling/fixing bikes, doing minor motor repairs, or working on a property maintenance crew. College towns often employ older teens to clean out apartments and paint them before new tenants move in. Job requirements include troubleshooting skills, a strong work ethic, and attention to detail. You will get your hands dirty with this job, but the compensation and skills gained are invaluable. 

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All photos by Lynne Conner.


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You may also like: 10 Great Teen Summer Jobs Part I

Be sure to read: PBCJolt Interviews Marina Hofman of Moms for America

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